Blogs

How to prevent the leading cause of injury death

Falls are the leading cause of injury death for Americans 65 years and older. Every year about 35-40 percent of adults 65 and older fall at least once. Among those that fall, 20-30 percent suffer moderate to severe injuries, including fractures and head trauma.

Many people who fall, even if they are not injured, develop a fear of falling. This fear of falling causes a decrease in activity, which leads to reduced mobility and loss of physical fitness, and actually increases their actual risk of falling.

Amy had a chance to sit down with Dr. Jeremy Osmond, Director of Rehab at Orchard Park Post-Acute Rehab, to find out more about what we can do to prevent falling. Jeremy compiled an action plan into four easy-to-remember tips using the acronym, MESH.

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What is a stroke, and what can I do about it?

What is a stroke

A stroke is the fourth leading cause of death. More than 133,000 people in the United States die from a stroke every year, and approximately 795,000 people experience a stroke per year — that’s one person every 40 seconds. But did you know that 80 percent of strokes are preventable?

Amy was able to interview Rachel Born, a Registered Nurse at Intermountain Health Care, to find out more about strokes and how we can act quickly to save ourselves and our loved ones.

QUESTION: Rachel, thank you so much for meeting with me. First of all, what is a stroke, exactly?

ANSWER: My pleasure. A stroke is a "brain attack,” or a disruption of blood flow to various areas of the brain. When this happens, the area of the brain that is not receiving blood dies.

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How to prevent the leading cause of injury death

prevent the leading cause of injury death

Falls are the leading cause of injury death for Americans 65 years and older. Every year about 35-40 percent of adults 65 and older fall at least once. Among those that fall, 20-30 percent suffer moderate to severe injuries, including fractures and head trauma.

Many people who fall, even if they are not injured, develop a fear of falling. This fear of falling causes a decrease in activity, which leads to reduced mobility and loss of physical fitness, and actually increases their actual risk of falling.

Amy had a chance to sit down with Dr. Jeremy Osmond, Director of Rehab at Orchard Park Post-Acute Rehab, to find out more about what we can do to prevent falling. Jeremy compiled an action plan into four easy-to-remember tips using the acronym, MESH.

Medications: Be mindful of medications. Some medications and/or combinations of medications can cause dizziness or drowsiness. These side effects are directly related to falls. Have a doctor or pharmacist look at your medication list to determine if you are at risk of these possible side effects.

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Health fair set for Provo Rec Center

Health fair set for Provo Rec Center

Get Healthy, Utah! Intermountain Utah Valley Heart and Vascular Services is sponsoring the Community Heart Fair on 9 a.m. to noon today at the Provo Rec Center.

This free event is open to everyone. Get your blood pressure, cholesterol, body fat and heart rate tested. Then step over to the booths, where you can learn more about the sleep center, the diabetes clinic, respiratory therapy, and food and nutrition. Wear your exercise clothes and hop into a spin, yoga or Zumba class. Then sample some healthy food at a cooking demonstration.

At 9 a.m., bestselling author Ron McMillan will speak on how to change anything —including your eating and exercise habits. McMillan is co-author of four immediate “New York Times” bestsellers and creator of four award-winning training programs of the same titles — “Crucial Conversations,” “Crucial Confrontations,” “Influencer” and “Change Anything.” He is also theco-founder of VitalSmarts, an innovator in corporate training and organizational performance for which he was awarded the 2007 Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year award. VitalSmarts has helped more than three hundred of the Fortune 500 realize significant results using a proven method for driving rapid, sustainable, and measurable change in behaviors.

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Demystifying menopause: Change in life doesn't have to be life-changing

Demystifying menopause

It doesn’t take many cobra poses or pickup games of basketball with your kids to realize that, as we age, we can’t do the things we were once accustomed to doing.

As a woman at the threshold of 40, it takes a little longer to catch my breath, to bend down to pick up a ball, or to recover from a particularly physical game. This week, I played a casual game of soccer with my family and was sore for three days. Even my 3-year-old was in better shape than I was.

One of the main concerns I have as I age is menopause. I have had friends enter this stage as early as 40 and as late as 55, and I have noticed many physical and emotional changes that accompany this very real condition. So, I sat down with Dr. David Young, an OBGYN and menopause specialist, to help demystify this part of the aging process.

 

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